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2021 Webinar Series

Unpacking Commercial Milk Formula Marketing: Communities, Contexts, and Impacts

The USBC is pleased to announce the 2021 three-part webinar series: Unpacking Commercial Milk Formula Marketing: Communities, Contexts, and ImpactsThis series marks the 40th anniversary of the adoption of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes and is part of an effort to create shared understanding of commercial milk formula marketing practices and the disparate impact of marketing practices on communities in the U.S. and around the world.

Join us for the second webinar in the series:

Commercial Milk Formula Marketing: Communities and Emergencies

Wednesday, June 2, 2021

2 – 3:30 pm ET

Register to access the webinar

Speakers:

  • Kimarie Bugg, Reaching Our Sisters Everywhere
  • Malaika Ludman, New Orleans Breastfeeding Center
  • Lourdes Santaballa, Alimentación Segura Infantil

The second session in the series will address how formula marketing impacts provision of lactation support to communities with diverse needs. Speakers will highlight the effects of formula marketing in BIPOC communities and the unique challenges of infant feeding in times of emergency or natural disaster. The United States has unique constraints compared to other countries that make applying the Code both difficult and contentious, and this impacts infant feeding for American families. Register now.

The first webinar in the series took place on Monday, May 3rd:

Commercial Milk Formula Marketing: International Contexts and Tools

Presented by:

  • Laurence Grummer-Strawn, PhD, Technical Officer, World Health Organization
  • Rachel Crossley, MSc, Senior Advisor, Access to Nutrition Initiative

The distinguished panelists described the international contexts of commercial milk formula marketing practices and impacts, as well as the role the U.S. plays in the global community. They discussed the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, which was published in 1981, but has yet to be adopted in the U.S., while highlighting potentially useful shifts in approach moving forward. They shared tools for recognizing and tracking commercial milk formula marketing practices in the U.S.. Key findings were shared from the 2018 “U.S. Access to Nutrition Index,” which included evaluation of three major manufacturers of infant formula and other products marketed as a partial or total replacement for breast milk.