Fiscal Year 2021 President’s Budget Released

Fiscal Year 2021 President’s Budget Released

The Office of Management and Budget has released "A Budget for America's Future – President's Budget FY 2021." The report contains the Budget Message of the President for Fiscal Year 2021, information on the President's priorities, and summary tables.

Additional supporting materials can be found on the Office of Management and Budget President's Budget webpage. Details specific to federal agencies that impact breastfeeding families can be found in the Department of Health and Human Services Budget In Brief, Center for Disease Control and Prevention Justification of Estimates for Appropriation CommitteesU.S. Department of Agriculture FY 2021 Budget Summary, 2021 USDA Explanatory Notes-Food And Nutrition Service, and Health Resources Service Administration Budget in Brief.

Funding updates from the fiscal year 2021 President's budget report and associated agency summary reports relevant to the breastfeeding field include:

  • Elimination of funding for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hospitals Promoting Breastfeeding program. This program was funded at $9 million for fiscal year 2020.
  • Elimination of funding for the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) program. The REACH program works to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities through local, culturally appropriate programs, including breastfeeding support programs. This program was funded at $59.95 million for fiscal year 2020.
  • $5.5 billion in funding for the Special Supplemental Nutrition program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), a $500 million decrease from the fiscal year 2020 level. The President's Budget also calls for a return to the $60 million funding level for WIC's Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Program, a $30 million decrease from the fiscal year 2020 level.
  • $1 billion in funding for paid family leave to new mothers and fathers, including adoptive parents. The proposal would allow States to establish paid parental leave programs in a way that is most appropriate for their workforce and economy.
  • Notice that the Women's Preventive Services Initiative will undergo an open competition which will include a review of updated evidence for breastfeeding services and supplies.
  • $760.7 million in funding for the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, a $73 million increase from the fiscal year 2020 level. MCH Block Grant programs include the Special Projects of Regional and National Significance (SPRANS) that address national or regional needs, priorities, or emerging issues, including support for breastfeeding.
  • $125.5 million in funding for the Healthy Start program, level funding from the fiscal year 2020 level. The Healthy Start program implements community-based interventions, including breastfeeding support.
  • $400 million in funding for the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, a $23.6 million increase from the fiscal year 2020 level. MIECHV home visitors work with families to determine their specific needs and provide services tailored to those needs, including providing information and guidance on breastfeeding.
  • $94.5 billion in funding for the Department of Health and Human Services, a 10-percent decrease from the 2020 level.
  • $38 billion in funding for research at the National Institutes of Health to improve public health, $4 billion above the level requested in the 2020 Budget.
  • $10.6 million in funding for the Head Start program, level funding from the fiscal year 2020 level.
  • $5.8 million in funding for the Child Care and Development Block Grant at the Department of Health and Human Services, level funding from the fiscal year 2020 level.
  • $11.1 billion in funding for the Department of Labor, a $1.3 billion decrease from the fiscal year 2020 level.
  • $7.6 billion in funding for the Indian Health Services, an increase of $262 million from the fiscal year 2020 level.
  • $116 million for the HHS-wide Improving Maternal Health in America Initiative. With additional funding, CDC will expand Maternal Mortality Review Committees to all 50 states and DC.
  • Elimination of the National Early Child Care Collaboratives program. The program implements obesity prevention initiatives targeting early childhood education settings to help establish and improve healthy nutrition and physical activity habits of young children, including breastfeeding.
  • Continued support for Perinatal Quality Collaboratives in 13 States to improve the quality of maternity care and health outcomes for women and newborns.
  • Continued support for the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS).


The USBC closely monitors the federal budget process and mobilizes the field to take action during strategic moments in the development process. The President's budget will set the stage for the federal budget negotiation process which will take place in the coming months. Policymakers need to hear that these programs are important to you!

*** Individuals are encouraged to use USBC's online action tool to contact Members of Congress in support of FY21 funding for CDC breastfeeding support programs.***

Subscribe to the Staying Abreast: Weekly Wire e-Newsletter to receive updates and action alerts, including organizational action opportunities related to FY21 funding.

Background on Federal Budget Process:

Each federal budget is developed for what is called a Fiscal Year, which begins on October 1 and runs through September 30 of the following year. Developing a federal budget begins with the President submitting a budget plan. The President's budget reflects the vision, values, and priorities of the Administration and sets the stage for the federal budget negotiation process.

Congress then develops its budget plan, called the budget resolution, to set a total amount for spending in the year ahead. The budget total is sent to the House and Senate appropriations committees, where it is divided among 12 subcommittees each charged with developing an appropriations bill. Appropriations Committees hold "mark-ups" for each of the 12 annual spending bills.

Once these bills pass both Houses, they must be "conferenced" to work out any differences between the two versions. House-Senate conference committees make final determinations and prepare a Conference Report. The Conference Report is then passed by the House and the Senate and sent to the President to be signed.

Learn more about the federal budget process.

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